Episodes

RunOut #11: Connor Herson Frees the Nose.

On November 19th, Connor Herson, a 15-year-old high school freshman from Emerald Hills, California became the 6th human to free-climb the Nose, only missing the 5th ascent to Keita Kurakami’s extraordinary free rope solo by a few days. Supported by his father Jim, a longtime valley climber, Connor freed the famous climb in a three-day...

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RunOut #10: Adam Ondra’s Near Onsight of the Salathe Wall

What do you consider to be a casual, non-serious climbing trip? Maybe it’s bouldering with your homies. Maybe it’s a few weeks of sport climbing on some Mediterranean island where the you end up spending as much time cragging as you do at the beach, drinking ouzo and snacking on roasted goat meat. For Adam...

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RunOut #9: Breaking the Fourth Wall in Free Solo with DP Mikey Schaefer

To free solo or not to free solo, is not the question of today’s podcast—but whether it is ethical to film it. Jimmy Chin and Chai Vasarhelyi’s documentary film Free Solo remains just about the biggest thing happening in climbing right now. It’s something that has haunted me and co-host Chris Kalous since we saw...

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RunOut #8: Caves, Plato, and the future of adventure

In the Republic, Plato presents an allegory of a cave in which prisoners have been shackled their whole lives, and their only understanding of reality derives from the shadows that are cast on the bleak cavern wall before them. It’s a way to tackle the philosophical problem of how our own subjective experiences limit our...

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RunOut #7: Free Solo Film and the Sweaty Palm.

It was only a few weeks ago that the Dawn Wall seized the Mylar Throne as best climbing movie ever and thrust a misunderstood Kevin Jorgeson deeply into our hearts.   Incidentally, the Mylar Throne is made from melted down Masters of Stone VCR cassettes. But like a resplendent child emperor, the Dawn Wall, though magnificent,...

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RunOut #6: Olympic Dreaming

The old adage “sport climbing is neither” is now a sad relic of atavistic time in climbing—a time before there were gyms, before there were World Cups, and before there were climbers capable of onsighting 9a+ but who instead choose to spend 30 hours a week training indoors, six to eight months a year, all...

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